Series LLCs: (Some of) What You Need to Know

A series LLC, a relatively recently authorized form of LLC, is composed of a master LLC—the Mother Ship—which houses a series of LLCs. Each series, silo, or cell (the potential synonyms are almost endless) within the series LLC often has separate owners, and each must always maintain separate records, especially records that account only for the assets of that series—at least if the series LLC is formed in Utah or Wyoming and other ULLCA states that allow for series LLCs.

Series, Silos, or Cells: more protection at less cost?

Similar to a corporate/subsidiaries business model and like their more well-known parent LLCs, series LLCs offer asset-protection benefits, but they avoid the complexities of corporate taxes, structure, and other required formalities. 

This type of entity is well suited for certain businesses that may benefit from its relative simplicity, reduced costs, and increased asset protection. But especially because they are so new, there are also some uncertainties associated with the series LLC.

Potential Benefits of the Series LLC:

1. Simplicity

  • Reduced Administration

Although each series must be administered separately, series LLCs have the potential to save time and administration costs.

2. Reduced Costs

  • One Registration

Each of the individual series is formed and governed by the master LLC’s operating agreement.  In most states—Wyoming and Utah, included—only the master LLC must be registered with the state, which means reduced fees.

  • Potential Sales Tax Savings

Some states may not require sales tax to be paid on rent that one series pays to another series.

3. Asset Protection

  • Mixed Signals

Under most series LLC statutes, each series is protected from judgments against assets in other series under the master LLC.  But it’s not clear that this protection will be respected in bankruptcy proceedings or in states that don’t recognize series LLCs.

Potential Downsides of the Series LLC:

1.  Some Additional Costs

  • Registered Agent

Many states require a separate registered agent for each series in the series LLC, which may mean additional expenses.

  • Formation Cost

The up-front registration fee for a series LLC may be higher than the registration fee of a regular LLC.  In some states, it may be less expensive to register multiple single-member LLCs rather than a series LLC with multiple series. This is generally not the case in Wyoming and Utah.

2. Governance Issues

  • Overlap Jeopardy

The operations may not be as streamlined as anticipated. The records of each series must be maintained separately, and each series must have its own separate bank accounts.  Can administrative functions among the series overlap without jeopardizing the limited liability? Can the ownership or management overlap? Does inadequate capitalization of one series impact the other series in the series LLC? At this point, these types of questions remain unanswered.

3. Liability Questions

  • Bankruptcy Issues

Federal bankruptcy laws do not yet address series LLC issues.  Can an

individual series within a series LLC file for bankruptcy? Are the assets of the non-filing series and the master LLC protected from the filing series?  At this time, there are no clear answers to these and other bankruptcy-related questions.

  • Choice-of-Law Issues

If a series LLC gets sued by a third party in a state that doesn’t authorize series LLCs, the assets of each series and the master LLC may be at risk. For LLCs that operate in states with and without series LLC statutes, this may make a series LLCs much less attractive.

The series LLC is potentially a star on the rise and is definitely worth watching.  If your business is particularly well suited to this compartmentalized approach—real estate investing, for example—and you live in one of the states[1] that currently authorizes series LLCs, you may want to this novel entity.


[1] As of November 2019, Alabama, Delaware, DC, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah Wisconsin, Wyoming, and Puerto Rico provide for series LLCs in their statutues.

Transferring LLC Membership Interests Part 3—Involuntary Transfers

An involuntary transfer of an LLC membership interest is just that—a transfer prompted by a creditor action or the occurrence of a triggering event outside of the member’s control. An individual or entity obtaining a membership interest as a result of an involuntary transfer usually cannot fully step into the shoes of the transferring member.

This statutory protection—often called a pick your partner provision—acts as a safeguard that provides LLC members with a certain amount of personal asset protection. For example, whereas the creditor of a corporate shareholder could reach and exercise shareholder rights to their full extent, the creditor of an LLC member can reach and exercise only the economic rights associated with membership interests—not the voting or management rights. The recipient of this type of membership interest is called an assignee.

Statutory Provisions – Creditor Action

If an LLC does not specify any transfer provisions, creditor actions are subject to state LLC laws. Each state, in its LLC statute, has provisions limiting what actions a creditor can take against an LLC member for personal debt. Depending on the state, the statutory remedies available to an LLC member’s personal creditors may include:

  • A charging order, which is a court order requiring the LLC to pay all the distributions due to the member-debtor from the LLC to the creditor.
  • A foreclosure on the member-debtor’s LLC ownership interest.
  • A court order to dissolve the LLC.

These remedies protect the other LLC members from the risk of having the creditor of a debtor-member step into the debtor-member’s place and share in the control of the LLC. To a varying degree, they also address the creditor’s right to satisfaction of the debt.

Transfer Provisions – Other Triggering Events

Transfer provisions are typically specified in the LLC’s operating agreement or in a separate buy-sell agreement. There may be some overlap with creditor actions, as these are often included as triggering events in the transfer provisions.

Examples of triggering events that can be specified in an LLC’s transfer provisions include the following:

  • A deceased member’s membership interest passes to a prohibited individual or entity
  • A member’s bankruptcy or other involuntary transfer of a membership interest to the member’s creditors
  • A member’s separation or divorce, or the transfer to a member’s spouse under property division or under a divorce or separation decree
  • A member’s membership interest becomes subject to a valid court order, levy, or other transfer that the LLC is required by law to recognize
  • A member’s breach of the LLC’s confidentiality
  • A member’s failure to comply with any mandatory provision of the operating agreement
  • A member’s failure to maintain a license or other qualification that disqualifies the member from engaging in the LLC’s primary business

If a triggering event occurs, the transfer provisions may prompt a mandatory redemption of the member’s membership interest or a right of first refusal to the LLC or to the other members. If an involuntary transfer does occur, the recipient of the membership interest—the assignee—typically receives only an economic interest in the LLC with no management or voting rights.

Limited Liability Companies in the News (I wrote)

So I haven’t been writing on my blog a lot lately. But I have been writing. Here are just three examples:

  1. The October 2018 issue of The LLC & Partnership Reporter, a publication of the ABA’s Business Law Section, sports an article I wrote titled, “Wyoming’s Series Limited Liability Company Act: (Virtually) All in the Operating Agreement.” You can find it on page 31. The piece makes clear that Wyoming’s new series act is straightforward and allows an LLC’s operating agreement to do most of the heavy lifting regarding how a particular LLC is managed and how members relate with one another and with third parties.
  2. Another article I wrote appears in the same issue, this one titled, “Utah’s ‘Benefit Limited Liability Company Act”: A Bridge Too Far?” My answer is Yes, the bridge isn’t even needed. You’ll have to read the piece to understand why. You can find it on page 42.
  3. My most recent article appears in the February 2019 issue of Wyoming Lawyer, a publication of the Wyoming Bar. Titled “2018 Case Law Review,” the story discusses a number of recent cases from around the country. I’m particularly interested in whether other states, including Wyoming and Utah, will follow the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals’ holding in Sky Cable, LLC v. DIRECTV and recognize the creditor’s remedy of reverse veil piercing. What’s reverse veil piercing, you ask? Read my article in Wyoming Lawyer!
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