Caregivers, Does this Describe You?

Northwestern Mutual recently published a survey of caregivers, those who take care of the infirm and aged. Among other things, this is what they found, according to Financial Advisor magazine:

Caregivers comprise a massive population segment, with 40 percent of the survey’s 1,003 respondents saying they were caregivers. Another 20 percent expect to step into that role.

While only 25 percent of future caregivers thought of financial support as a key attribute of caregiving, 64 percent of current caregivers ended up providing some level of financial support to their charges. Expenses related to giving care comprised nearly one-third of their budgets, according to the current caregivers.

Most future caregivers, 70 percent, expect to incur financial costs, yet only 60 percent said that they were equipped to handle the potential financial aspects of caregiving. (Emphasis supplied)

Just one more reason for people–both caregivers and those who will need it–to plan for the future. Long-term care insurance, life insurance, trust planning anyone?

IRA Rollover Gotcha Down?

We all know the rule:

Sections 402(c)(3) and 408(d)(3) provide that any amount distributed from a qualified plan or IRA will be excluded from income if it is transferred to an eligible retirement plan no later than the 60th day following the day of receipt. A similar rule applies to § 403(a) annuity plans, § 403(b) tax sheltered annuities, and § 457 eligible governmental plans. See §§ 403(a)(4)(B), 403(b)(8)(B), and 457(e)(16)(B).

No, actually, we all know that rule stated this way:

You have 60 days to get your distribution from one IRA or retirement plan to another IRA or retirement plan, or you suffer the tax consequences. The “getting to one from another” is called a rollover–typically an IRA rollover.

If you fail to complete the rollover within 60 days, the penalties can be severe, including income and excise taxes, interest, and penalties.

get-out-of-jail-freePeople do rollovers for a variety of reasons. They retire. They change jobs. They become dissatisfied with their current IRA provider. In those cases and others, there’s a need to change move your retirement money from one plan to another. And typically the move goes smoothly–without a hitch.

Except when it doesn’t. What if the rollover takes more than 60 days? Then what?

Well, the IRS recently issued a new rule, Revenue Procedure 2016-47, that recognizes certain realities: Life happens.

  • Checks get misplaced
  • Houses burn down
  • The Post Office screws up
  • The fish were biting (just kidding)

Yup. If life hits you in the face, the IRS is going to wipe the tears away and tell you to go back outside and play–that is, they’re going to waive any penalties. There is a catch–of course:

  • What hit you in the face must be among the many excuses the IRS lists in the Revenue Procedure 2016-47 AND
  • You must complete the rollover “as soon as practicable” after the intervening reason no longer exists (there’s a 30 day safe harbor, though you can take longer) AND
  • You must self certify to your new plan administrator or IRA trustee that you meet the requirements of the Revenue Procedure AND
  • The IRS previously must not have denied a waiver.

The Revenue Procedure provides a  handy self-certification letter, the wording of which you must follow almost to the T.  You can find the sample letter here, in the appendix of the actual Revenue Procedure. Enjoy the read.

Retirement Dreams

Bloomberg offers up the stories of three couples who retired early–as in at age 40. If that’s a path you’d like to follow, have a read.

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